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  Education > Human Rights Arts and Writing Competition

**Details for White Rose Art & Writing Project 2016 coming soon**

*Contact edu.admin@holocaust.org.za further information*


The Cape Town Holocaust Centre runs an annual art and writing competition, named for The White Rose movement, which consisted of a group of German university students who resisted Nazi oppression.

The closing date for entries is Thursday 30 July 2015.

If you wish to enter the 2015 competition,
click here to download the entry pack


What is the aim of The White Rose Art & Writing Competition?

  • Our hope is that the competition will facilitate a greater understanding of the need to protect Human Rights and to respond to injustice in this country and globally. We hope that it will give students the opportunity to learn about who resisted the Nazis (and how), as well as to consider what relevance this history has for a South African in 2015.
  • The competition is aimed at encouraging cross-curricular study.
  • Educators may choose to use the topics of the competition as an activity for learners' portfolios.

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Who can enter?

  • ANY Grade 9 - 12 learners, no matter which subjects you take.
  • The competition is divided into two sections: a Junior Category (Grade 9 - 10) and Senior Category (Grade 11 - 12).
  • Learners may choose to enter the writing and/or art section.

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Amazing prizes to be won!

We look forward to receiving your entry! For further information, please contact Orli Barnett at The Cape Town Holocaust Centre at 021 462 5553 or edu.admin@holocaust.org.za.

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The competition topic

RESISTING INJUSTICE

For this year's competition, learners will examine the forms that resistance to the Nazi regime took, and learn about those who resisted.

Learners will be given a broad scope within which to respond to the theme “Resisting Injustice”. Within the Writing Section, they can elect to write a research essay on acts of resistance, or to submit their personal response in the form of a poem, essay or story. In the Art Section, learners can submit an artwork that expresses their response to either a given text/poem, or to acts of resistance in a more general sense. Alternatively, learners may choose to create a memorial or installation honouring individuals, groups or movements that resisted the Nazi regime during the Holocaust.

All art and writing submissions must be accompanied by a completed entry form, and must be the original work of the learner. The closing date for entries is Thursday 30 July 2015.

If you wish to enter the 2015 competition,
click here to download the entry pack.

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Previous Categories

Responding to Injustice

Learners examined examples of individuals who risked their lives and the lives of their families to save Jews. Our hope was that the competition would facilitate a greater understanding of the need to protect Human Rights and respond to injustice in this country and globally. The competition was aimed at encouraging cross-curricular study.

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Seeking safety in a hostile environment

The topic was developed in response to the outbreak of xenophobic violence in 2008. Learners were invited to respond to the story of the plight of refugees fleeing the Nazi regime, and to reflect on the connections between the prejudices experienced in the past with contemporary events.

Growing up in the shadow of the Swastika: being young in Nazi Germany

We hoped that this topic would encourage learners to examine critically the manner in which the Nazis attempted to manipulate and form young people's identities in order to support the Nazi view of who was human and who was 'undesirable' and ultimately not worthy of life. However, as we also believe that learning about the Holocaust should encourage learners to reflect on their responsibility to others, and what that means living within a democratic society, we asked learners to examine the different ways in which young people responded to the Nazi's attempts to form their identities.

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Previous entries

2014

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2013

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Report on the 2012 Prize Winners


Senior Writing winner
Fly Away With Me, a song by Katherine Werge

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Prize Winning Art 2011



Winner Senior Writing Category
Dear Bystander by Chelsea Kelly



Runner-up Senior Writing Category
Polluted Blood and Pure by Hannah Macmillan


Senior Art Category winning entry
"My Suitcase" by Catherine Paterson

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Prize Winning Art 2010



Rustenburg educator Cedric van Dyk, Tracey Petersen (Education Director, Cape Town Holocaust Centre) and Richard Freedman (National Director, South African Holocaust & Genocide Foundation) with learners Jessica Loiszides and Zahra Perry, who shared first prize in the Senior Art category.

Herzlia High School learners Jessica Kermis, Nina Leon, and Emma Strumpman; seen here with their artworks; were all highly commended for their entries

In Pursuit of Normality by Jessica Loiszides, Rustenburg.

Human Uniform by Zahra Perry, Rustenburg

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Prize Winning Art 2009

Zero
i see
grey people in photographs
like old soggy cardboard, smelling of smoke and rust
and a silver sun in the white dawn sky;
the tired grey people watch me, and
i don’t know

if they would have wanted
me to look at them sixty-odd years later
in a museum –
do you want to be in a museum?
in the reverent quiet,
with everyone talking
so carefully in case they hurt the photographs’ feelings
do you want that?
i wonder

and then i think
that if I had been in a grey place
in a cold grey hungry place
about to become a number
just another zero number
i wouldn’t want to disappear
i wouldn’t want to slide away into the empty darkness
i’d want to be remembered
be remembered

and right now
i just want to be sad about it
i don’t want to know the numbers ‘cause numbers confuse me
i don’t have to be jewish to be sad about it
or gay or gypsy or slavic
i just have to be human, because
it’s for everyone to see and know
see and know and remember
see and know and remember and be sad
so that maybe
one day the sadness will stop happening
so that maybe
one day no one will ever have to be sad again.

so anyway i watched the movie about Anne Frank
and at the end i caught myself thinking
wistfully: oh no, poor kid – oh wouldn’t it
be nice if she had lived
had come back home –

then i realised
that i should be thinking that
6 000 000 times over
and that’s a lot of zeroes.

Camilla Christie (grade 11)


Georgina Annenberg receives her certificate from visiting scholar Dr Debórah Dwork.

Georgina Annenberg of Herzlia Middle School with her entry, which received the Director’s Certificate of Merit

Miranda Kantor of Herzlia Middle School with her work “Nachamu Nachamu” (Comfort Comfort) which was highly commended for her meritous work.

Tal Hartuv receives his prize from visiting scholar Dr Debórah Dwork.

Tal Hartuv of Herzlia Middle School with his prize winning entry, “Backtrack”

Winning Art from 2007/8

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